xensin:

LOOK AT ITS LITTLE DOUBLE CHIN

xensin:

LOOK AT ITS LITTLE DOUBLE CHIN

25/7/2014 . 41,739 notes . Reblog
thecivilwarparlor:

Three Unidentified Soldiers Playing Cards, Smoking, And Drinking In Front Of American Flag
Liquor- One soldier analyzed one issue of whiskey and with a straight face adjudged it to be a combination of “bark juice, tar-water, turpentine, brown sugar, lamp-oil and alcohol.” The potency of the liquor is readily evident from some of the nicknames given to it: “Old Red Eye,” “Rifle Knock-Knee,” “How Come You So,” and “Help Me to Sleep, Mother.”
Gambling- “The temptations that will beset you will be very great,” a Mississippi man, already a veteran in the Civil War, warned his newly enlisted younger brother. The evil he warned of wasn’t treason or desertion or theft. It was cards. “Of all the evil practices that abound in Camp, gambling is the most pernicious and fraught with the most direful consequences.”
Smoking-By the 1800’s, many people had begun using small amounts of tobacco. Some chewed it. Others smoked it occasionally in a pipe, or they hand-rolled a cigarette or cigar. On the average, people smoked about 40 cigarettes a year. The first commercial cigarettes were made in 1865 by Washington Duke on his 300-acre farm in Raleigh, North Carolina. His hand-rolled cigarettes were sold to soldiers at the end of the Civil War.
PHOTO: Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
http://www.nps.gov/history/history/online_books/civil_war_series/3/sec3.htm
http://healthliteracy.worlded.org/docs/tobacco/Unit1/2history_of.html
 The life of Johnny Reb: The Common Soldier of the Confederacy by Bell Irvin Wiley

thecivilwarparlor:

Three Unidentified Soldiers Playing Cards, Smoking, And Drinking In Front Of American Flag

  • Liquor- One soldier analyzed one issue of whiskey and with a straight face adjudged it to be a combination of “bark juice, tar-water, turpentine, brown sugar, lamp-oil and alcohol.” The potency of the liquor is readily evident from some of the nicknames given to it: “Old Red Eye,” “Rifle Knock-Knee,” “How Come You So,” and “Help Me to Sleep, Mother.”
  • Gambling- “The temptations that will beset you will be very great,” a Mississippi man, already a veteran in the Civil War, warned his newly enlisted younger brother. The evil he warned of wasn’t treason or desertion or theft. It was cards. “Of all the evil practices that abound in Camp, gambling is the most pernicious and fraught with the most direful consequences.”
  • Smoking-By the 1800’s, many people had begun using small amounts of tobacco. Some chewed it. Others smoked it occasionally in a pipe, or they hand-rolled a cigarette or cigar. On the average, people smoked about 40 cigarettes a year. The first commercial cigarettes were made in 1865 by Washington Duke on his 300-acre farm in Raleigh, North Carolina. His hand-rolled cigarettes were sold to soldiers at the end of the Civil War.

25/7/2014 . 33 notes . Reblog

thecivilwarparlor:

Civil War Dominos & Playing Cards

Soldiers Playing Cards In Camp (Library of Congress)

During the war, soldiers enjoyed many idle hours in camp. Time was spent in repairing uniforms, writing letters, guard duty, fatigue duty, spiritual activities, and engaging in other pursuits, such as playing cards and dominos. It was common for soldiers to carry cards and dominos in their haversacks, knapsacks or pockets.

Playing cards of the period were plain, lacking numbers and markings on the face cards. Dominos were made of various materials including wood, bone and ivory.

Gambling and card playing were condemned by many chaplains on both sides as a violation of the Christian faith. Aided by families at home, chaplains and religious leaders tried to convince soldiers to end the practice. Some men took such persuasion to heart and divested themselves of their cards; others threw decks of cards away as they marched into battle, only to retrieve them later. Undoubtedly, many soldiers carried both playing cards and Bibles, a representation of the on-going battle in their minds between the sacred and secular worlds.

Image Wilson’s Creek National Battlefield; WICR 30417 & 30433 Springfield-Greene County Library System

24/7/2014 . 64 notes . Reblog
thecivilwarparlor:

Two Unidentified Soldiers In Union Uniforms Drinking Whiskey And Playing Cards


WHISKEY SKIN 1 wine glass Scotch or Irish whiskey 1 piece of lemon peel Add the above to a tumbler and fill one-half full of boiling water. This is called a Columbia Skin in Boston.From Bon-Vivant’s Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.
Thomas finished The Bar-Tender’s Guide (alternately titled How to Mix Drinks or The Bon-Vivant’s Companion), the first drink book ever published in the United States. The book collected and codified what was then an oral tradition of recipes from the early days of cocktails, including some of his own creations; the guide laid down the principles for formulating mixed drinks of all categories
Digital ID:  (digital file from original item) ppmsca 33415 http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/ppmsca.33415 
Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-33415 (digital file from original item)
Repository: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

thecivilwarparlor:

Two Unidentified Soldiers In Union Uniforms Drinking Whiskey And Playing Cards

WHISKEY SKIN

1 wine glass Scotch or Irish whiskey
1 piece of lemon peel

Add the above to a tumbler and fill one-half full of boiling water. This is called a Columbia Skin in Boston.
From Bon-Vivant’s Companion by Jerry Thomas, 1862.

Thomas finished The Bar-Tender’s Guide (alternately titled How to Mix Drinks or The Bon-Vivant’s Companion), the first drink book ever published in the United States. The book collected and codified what was then an oral tradition of recipes from the early days of cocktails, including some of his own creations; the guide laid down the principles for formulating mixed drinks of all categories

24/7/2014 . 31 notes . Reblog

thecivilwarparlor:

OLD CROW HAND MADE SOUR MASH AND ULYSSES S. GRANT

He had a distinctly Southern taste when it came to liquor

It has been said that it was the drink of choice for American general and later 18th President of the United States, Ulysses S. Grant

An apocryphal story about Grant’s drinking has the general’s critics going to President Abraham Lincoln, charging the military man with being a drunk. Lincoln is supposed to have replied, “By the way, gentlemen, can either of you tell me where General Grant procures his whiskey ? Because, if I can find out, I will send every general in the field a barrel of it!-

{no source} but a great quote… reprinted in other newspapers such as the Daily Constitutional Union of Washington D.C.  and the Cleveland Plain Dealer of Cleveland, Ohio.

This popular story has been disseminated in numerous books and periodicals from 1863 to the present day. But testimony regarding its originality and veracity is complex and contradictory. Some individuals have claimed that they heard the joke directly from Lincoln, and other individuals have stated that Lincoln denied telling the joke. In addition, critics have questioned the novelty of the jest.

On October 30, 1863 a compact version of the story was printed in the New York Times: 

When some one charged Gen. Grant, in the President’s hearing, with drinking too much liquor, Mr. Lincoln, recalling Gen. Grant’s successes, said that if he could find out what brand of whisky Grant drank, he would send a barrel of it to all the other commanders.

The label’s founder, Kentuckian via Scotland Dr. James Crow is credited with perfecting the sour mash method of whiskey making in the mid 19th century, and thus became one of the first makers of true Kentucky bourbon.

http://www.esquire.com/the-side/food-and-drink/historic-men-drinks-2#slide-2

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Crow

http://quoteinvestigator.com/2013/02/18/barrel-of-whiskey/

24/7/2014 . 55 notes . Reblog
24/7/2014 . 3,125 notes . Reblog

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Letter from Amelia Earhart to President Roosevelt Regarding her World Flight, 11/10/1936 .

Item From: Papers as President. (1933-1945).

Every signature tells a story. Disclosed in this letter written to the President, notifies him of a trip around the world, the stops being planned, and possible corporation with the navy needed. All this signed by Amelia Earhart. Today in celebration of the achievements made by this female aviator, share your own story of travel.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/jQz3

24/7/2014 . 56 notes . Reblog
24/7/2014 . 17,277 notes . Reblog

A 15-inch goldfish named Bruce is lifted from the water at a fish farm in Dongguan, China, in 2002. Photograph by Bobby Yip/Reuters

A 15-inch goldfish named Bruce is lifted from the water at a fish farm in Dongguan, China, in 2002. Photograph by Bobby Yip/Reuters

24/7/2014 . 56,531 notes . Reblog
frustrated-fallen-angel:

gallifreyanprincess:

insanitymobs:

asktheminecrafthuntress:

ykfinch:

ask-shadefire-midnight-and-elsa:

askdiamonddust:

funnyandhilarious:

New type of airplane… »

Oh hell nah!

My dad would be terrified

I would want the aisle seat.

Imagine it’s a late night flight, and everyone’s dozing off. In your half-asleep stupor you look down at the floor and you see a face gazing in at you through the glass, a face of something not quite human..

welcome to Tumblr, where the most interesting topics twist into nightmares.

how cool

frustrated-fallen-angel:

gallifreyanprincess:

insanitymobs:

asktheminecrafthuntress:

ykfinch:

ask-shadefire-midnight-and-elsa:

askdiamonddust:

funnyandhilarious:

New type of airplane… »

Oh hell nah!

My dad would be terrified

I would want the aisle seat.

Imagine it’s a late night flight, and everyone’s dozing off. In your half-asleep stupor you look down at the floor and you see a face gazing in at you through the glass, a face of something not quite human..

welcome to Tumblr, where the most interesting topics twist into nightmares.

how cool

24/7/2014 . 46,156 notes . Reblog